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I Wish I Could Be Like the Cool Moms - Day 25

If you're stuck in preschool land you may not have listened to anything more current than "The Wheels on the Bus" lately, but if you also have teenagers you've probably found yourself humming about wishing you could be like the cool kids courtesy of Echosmith.  Radio stations are giving it lots of playtime because everyone remembers that feeling from their school days. Adults might even secretly admit to themselves that they still feel the pull toward wishing they were cooler, especially Moms. And especially near the days of the Halloween pressure-cooker.



If you have no idea what I'm talking about, here are the lyrics of the beginning of the song.

She sees them walking in a straight line, that's not really her style.
And they all got the same heartbeat, but hers is falling behind.
Nothing in this world could ever bring them down.
Yeah, they're invincible, and she's just in the background.
And she says,

"I wish that I could be like the cool kids,
'Cause all the cool kids, they seem to fit in.
I wish that I could be like the cool kids, like the cool kids."

Us grownup mom's like to think we've grown out of the peer pressure thing. But we know we haven't.  To our chagrin, what other people think, particularly our kids and other moms, has a lot of sway on our emotions and our evaluation of what kind of mom we are.

Let me talk to you about that on this day after Halloween while the "Costuming your Kid" thing is still fresh in your memory.

Can I loudly remind you,

Comparison is the thief of joy!

Some Moms thrive on all things craft and DIY. Some Moms don't.

Some Moms' favorite thing about Halloween for their kids is having a ready-made reason to put on some cute boots, grab a mug of something hot, and take a long walk with your husband and friends behind your costume-clad kids.  It's an undercover date night.

Still other Moms shine most after the trick-or-treating is done and they can pull out their analytic superpowers.  Sorting, counting, and comparing the contents of this year's haul with last years can make you a hero to your left-brained child. Ever heard of a Halloween candy Excel spreadsheet?

If you're Spreadsheet Mom, STOP comparing yourself with DIY costume Mom!!!

It's time we took back the definition of cool.  

Cool is the attitude that comes with figuring out who you are and being it with gusto!

God made you a certain way because you're what the world needs. More importantly, YOU are what YOUR world needs.  Don't rob your people of the custom-made Mom God gave them by comparing yourself to the "Cool Moms" out there.  You are cool. Be it without apology and unabashed.  The thing certain to bring your kids the best memories - you being you.

Look over at your kid right now, surrounded by candy wrappers, in their pajamas, licking chocolate off their fingers while you're busy at the computer....

HAPPINESS!!

Their happiness is much simpler than Pinterest makes it out to be.  They're not stressing out about the costume you didn't make. A bag full of free candy and a Mom who's happy being who she is - it's enough and it's a beautiful thing.

Stop wishing. Just be the cool Mom you already are.



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Comments

  1. I had just that thought this morning. "Wish I could be a cool mom like..."
    Great reflection. We are all cool moms with our own unique style. We just need to remember that. Thanks for the reminder!

    ReplyDelete

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