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The Seasonality of Motherhood - The Glorious Table

I am writing over at The Glorious Table today as part of their Motherhood series. I have learned so much about life by being a mom. One lesson is that a well lived life needs to be lived in seasons...

The Seasonality of Motherhood

 I am ignoring the barbecue sauce I just found on the toilet seat. It came from the beard of a thirsty dog who finished off some rib remnants she found in the trash while we were sleeping. Dishes are crusting over in the sink, and my fingernails are four days past in need of polish remover. It’s hard to stay here with my computer, trying to focus my mind and write. But the house is quiet now. I see a string of minutes, maybe even hours, laid out ahead. So I will stay, because this moment, this season, was made for writing, made for accomplishing a call on my life, a purpose I was made for. There will be moments in this day, or maybe the next, for the barbecue sauce. Housework doesn’t win this hand–writing does, unless the trump card gets played.
I ignored the barbecue sauce in favor of writing, but then I moved the computer to make way for a little someone who appeared from her bedroom, warm to the touch. Her need for the best of me supersedes everything else. She holds the trump card: she calls me Mom.
may_floridaA satisfying life asks us to be in a constant dance with our priorities–adjusting, moving with the flow, thinking ahead and, now and then choosing to go where the music moves instead of with the carefully planned choreography. Beauty is equally in the plan and in the adjustments.
We believe the lie that steals our focus and the I’m killing it feeling. The lie says I can have it all. The truth is, we can have it all, but we usually can’t have it all at the same time. 
Read more by pulling up a chair at The Glorious Table.


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